Can you crack the code?

09
Oct 19
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“Every great developer you know got there by solving problems they were unqualified to solve until they actually did it.” – Patrick McKenzie

A good developer is a good problem solver.

While programming is arguably a creative exercise of creating something out of nothing, for it to take flight the programmer must first overcome a series of problems.

The biggest challenges facing DevOps professionals, however, are more complex than code:

  1. Transforming organisational culture

According to datree.io, 75% of organisational change initiatives fail and the leading cause is  neglecting the company culture. With the primary reason for DevOps being faster, more seemless project turnaround, achieving this requires communication and collaboration across departments.

This extends to gaining organisational buy-in, reaching beyond IT to the executive team and business managers.

2. Breaking down silos

With the demand for collaboration and communication comes the necessity to deconstruct pre-existing expertise-based silos in the  favour of cross-functional teams. Carefully planned structures and supporting processes are crucial for these new teams to succeed.

3. Optimise and automate

Shorter release cycles result in less time to build, test and deploy changes. A manual pipeline delays release while rushed development will see compromised quality. The most common answer is automation, however automated deployment cycles leave little time for reviews and increases the risk of lapses in security or misconfiguring infrastructure.

4. Out with the old

Relying on legacy infrastructure causes stability problems without the support of current suppliers and you’re likely to be left behind by competitors. If a company doesn’t consistently innovate, it will be replaced by one that is able to offer consumers more.

5. Clash of the toolsets

Development and Operations teams have completely different toolsets and metrics. It’s important to understand which tools need to be integrated and which metrics should be monitored moving forward.

These aren’t problems that can be solved by the individual and it’s important for teams, organisations and sectors to unite in sharing insight on the latest developments of DevOps and break down traditional methods to make way for innovation.

The DevOps & Agile Digital Transformation for Government conference, running in Canberra from 26 – 28 November 2019, will bring leaders of government administration from across Australia together to discuss how DevOps and Agile digital transformation strategies can be used effectively to drive greater efficiency, productivity, deliver greater value for public money and increase government’s ability to respond quickly and effectively to changing ICT infrastructure needs.

Oh, and here’s the answer:

Submitted by Criterion Content Team

Criterion Content Team

This post has been written by the Criterion Conferences Content Team. Based in Sydney, we are an independent research organisation, producing over 90 conferences a year across a variety of industries. Our events, attended by thousands of senior delegates from the public and private sector, are designed to enrich, inspire and motivate. Our focus is on providing innovative, value adding content via our conferences and blogs like this are extension of that principle. You can view our conferences by visiting our website http://www.criterionconferences.com/conferences.

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