A glimpse into Conference Production

02
Dec 16
Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterGoogle+Share on FacebookEmail to someone

After completing my undergraduate degree in Communication at UTS, I travelled for a few months and worked overseas. Upon my return to Sydney I was interested to take up a new challenge and jump into a role that allowed me to explore various industries. I fell onto the job title “Conference Producer” online and the title itself is what attracted me to apply for the role.

As a Conference Producer, we work on a 20 day cycle. Every cycle, we’re given a new topic to research. Topics always vary in terms of area of focus. Once given the topic, we begin speaking with experts in the field and unlocking the key challenges faced. We then begin to put an agenda together that tackles key issues and invite key leaders to speak at the conference. Throughout the process we also liaise with other departments to make sure we’re getting all aspects of the event right (timing, location, target audience…etc.)

For the past five months, I’ve been able to develop various skills due to the diverse dynamic the job requires. Let me share with you a bit of insight into the role.

  • Diversity – Moving from one topic to another on a 20 day cycle has allowed me to become more flexible and agile in my work and thinking as we juggle various topics in a short period of time. 
  • Research – Getting a different topic on monthly basis means that we have to get as much information as we can efficiently. Our best research method is calling experts. So far, I’ve improved my listening and analysing skills. It’s vital to spot the main issues associated with the topic and dig further to get the angle right.
  • Communication skills – Contacting experts via phone and/or emails means that we have to be concise and clear. One of my weaknesses when I first started the job was asking the right questions and getting to the point. I’ve been slowly improving that with much practice with different industries. 
  • Project management – As we are the creator of the product, we work closely with all departments (Operations, Marketing and Sales) to ensure the right messaging, packaging and branding of the product. This has been by far the biggest learning curve. Working with various departments has allowed me to approach conference producing from the marketing, selling and operational lens. With every new project, I learn a new perspective to keep in mind and apply in my next cycle. Working closely with other departments also means teamwork, time management and organisational skills are constantly being tested and developed. 
  • Problem solving – The nature of the job requires us to think on our feet. As the key reference for the product, we are approached by different departments in the business to maintain a high participation rate for the event. As a conference producer you also ensure everything’s running smoothly on the day of the conference and coordinate with speakers. This really teaches you to think on your feet and ensure all parties involved are satisfied (venue, delegates, speakers and sponsors).

Most importantly, the environment is a supportive one, and we’re constantly challenging each other’s ideas looking for different ways to grow. With such a fast paced environment you’d expect us to be glued to our desks, but the team holds activities on day to day basis so we can step away from our laptops, discuss some challenges we may be facing and generally just have a good time before we head back to producing conferences!

ezgif.com-optimize

Celebrating a finalised agenda with the Production Team maracas!

Interested in joining the team? Learn more about working with us >

Submitted by Racha Kamal

Racha Kamal

Racha is a Producer who’s passionate about people and community development. Racha brings her previous experience in international not-for-profit organisations to the diverse world of conferences, linking people’s ideas to create practical solutions. Over the weekend, you’ll find Racha anywhere between the water and your typical hipster coffee shop.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Other blog posts you may enjoy: